Three Strategies for Fighting Educator Self-Abuse

Updated: Oct 3, 2021

I’m not smart enough to keep up with new technology.


I’m not cut out for this new way of teaching.


I’m not good enough to be able to keep up with my own kids and my students.


I’ve gained all this weight during the pandemic and I’m so fat.


The teachers on social media are brilliant. I don’t have the ability to do the things they do. I’m just not good enough.


I live with constant guilt that I can’t keep up.


I’m not resilient enough, brilliant enough, or tech-savvy enough to do anything well.


I suck.


When I first discovered the concept of self-abuse, the physical, mental, spiritual, or emotional abuse of oneself, I was a little skeptical. The addition of the term “abuse” made it feel dramatic…and yet, I wrestled with the questions of “Are we just adding abuse to everything now to make it sound terrible” or “Is self-abuse just not widely spoken about because, like many mental health issues, it’s stigmatized?”


In the processing of my thoughts I came to this conclusion: if someone else would say these things to us repeatedly, it would be considered abuse. Therefore, very much a thing.